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Acupressure for Facial Enhancement
By: Ping Zhang, Ph.D.

Acupuncture is probably the best known, most common, and most accepted Chinese natural treatment to help your face and body turn back the hands of time. Acupressure uses the same principles as acupuncture, replacing the familiar needles with pressure from the fingers or hands. Acupressure can be used to correct the internal imbalances that create the face's wrinkles, sagging, discoloration, dark circles, or "bags" under the eyes.

How Does Acupressure Work?

Acupressure's power for facial rejuvenation manifests in different ways:

  • It helps the body regulate the free flow of Qi and blood to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  • It encourages lymph drainage and enhances the skin's ability to "breathe."

  • It stimulates the skin's own ability for collagen production, softening the skin and smoothing wrinkles, and promotes normal secretion from the sweat and oil glands.

  • It regulates and stimulates internal organ system function and promotes muscle contraction.


5-Minute Acupressure Workout to Smooth Wrinkles and Firm Up the Face

Draining the lymph system, smoothing the wrinkles

  • Begin at the Yin Tang point using the thumbs, and stroke bilaterally to Tai Yang.  Repeat 3 times.

  • With the pads of the thumb, move from Tai Yang to SJ21, SI 19, and GB2, using direct digital pressure on each point 2 to 3 times (Fig.1).

  • Using 3 inner fingers of both hands to massage the occipital line on the back of the neck from middle towards outside for 30 seconds with circular motion, making sure to cover the points Du16, Bl9, Gb20, Anmian, and SJ17.

Lifting and firmimg the face, chin, and neck

  • Stroke from Yu Yao to GB14, then down the stomach channel through to ST7 and ST6, then up to ST4, ST3, ST2, and back to Yu Yao. Repeat 3 to 5 times (Fig.2)

  • Press on DU20 and extra points Si Shen Cong. Repeat 3 to 5 times.

  • Using the pads of the thumbs, stroke from Yin Tang to DU23, from UB2 up to UB5, from Yu Yao to GB14, and then up to UB4.  Next, stroke from Tai Yang to ST8. Repeat 9 to 12 times (See Fig.3).

  • For neck wrinkles: Stroke from ST9 to SJ17. Repeat 3–5 times (See Fig.4).

Stimulating the body's energy channels

  • Stimulating the following energy channels, especially the parts of channels running through extremities: stomach, liver, spleen, kidney, bladder, and large intestine.

  • Use the palm with circular motion massage back and forth for 30 seconds on each channel, or using a 4-inch-long dried loofa, massage these channels with the same motion as the hand.


About the Author:

Ping Zhang holds a Ph.D. degree in Oriental medicine with more than 10 years of clinical and teaching experience.  She represents the 4th generation of her family practicing traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and is the author of two books: A Comprehensive Handbook for Traditional Chinese Medicine Facial Rejuvenation and Anti-Aging Therapy.  She is also the creator of the TCM Facial Rejuvenation Education DVD series and the Nefeli line of anti-aging products.  She currently hosts a Web-based radio program, "Traditional Chinese Medicine with Dr. Ping."  She is also a frequent interview subject and guest expert in TCM by major news media and magazines, such as Reuters, Newsday, Elle magazine, and many local and regional broadcasts.