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Sufferers of Chronic Fatigue Find Relief With Oriental Medicine
By: Jennifer Dubowsky, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is far more than just being tired.  It is a frustrating, complicated disorder characterized by extreme fatigue that may worsen with physical or mental activity and does not improve with rest.  Those affected with CFS can get so run down that it interferes with the ability to function in day to day activities with some becoming severely disabled and even bedridden.  In addition to extreme fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome encompasses a wide range of other symptoms, including but not limited to, headaches, flu like symptoms and chronic pain.

If you suffer from CFS, Oriental medicine can help relieve many of your symptoms.  Exceptional for relieving aches and pains, acupuncture and Oriental medicine treatments can help you avoid getting sick as often, and recover more quickly, as well as improve your vitality and stamina.

Research on Chronic Fatigue and Acupuncture

A study in China evaluated cupping as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome.  All of the study patients complained of fatigue and some had additional problems with headaches, insomnia, muscle-joint pains, backaches and pains, poor memory, gastrointestinal disturbances, and bitter taste in their mouth, among others.  Patients ranging in age from 28-54 received sliding cupping treatments twice a week for a total of 12 treatments.   The results showed there was vast improvement in fatigue levels, insomnia, poor memory, spontaneous sweating, sore throat, profuse dreams, poor intake, abdominal distention, diarrhea, and alternating constipation and diarrhea.

In another study conducted at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of TCM in Guangzhou, China, subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome were evenly divided by random selection into an acupuncture group and a control group. The observation group was treated with acupuncture and the control group was treated with an injection.  Participants completed a fatigue scale and results showed that people who received acupuncture reported significantly more relief from their symptoms.  A similar study conducted in Hong Kong gave half of the group conventional needle acupuncture and half (the control group) sham acupuncture. Again, using a fatigue scale, improvements in physical and mental fatigue were significantly bigger in the acupuncture group and no adverse events occurred.

Most significantly, 28 papers were statistically reviewed through a meta analysis in order to assess the success of acupuncture as a therapy for CFS. The results showed that treatment groups receiving acupuncture for chronic fatigue syndrome had superior results when compared with control groups. Rightly, they concluded that acupuncture therapy is effective for chronic fatigue syndrome and that it does merit additional research.

If you are struggling with chronic fatigue syndrome contact an acupuncturist near you today to see how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can be incorporated into your treatment plan!

 

About the AuthorJennifer Dubowsky, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.  is an active blogger and writer, including authoring articles for Acufinder. On her blog Acupuncture Blog Chicago, Jennifer's posts bring information about Chinese medicine, acupuncture, herbal treatments, nutrition, and healthy living to professionals and interested consumers.  She also provides updates about acupuncture research and links to the studies.  Jennifer earned her Master of Science degree in Oriental Medicine from Southwest Acupuncture College, an accredited four-year Masters program in Boulder, Colorado. She received her Diplomate from NCCAOM, the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and completed an internship at the Sino-Japanese Friendship Hospital in Beijing, China. Jennifer has been in practice in Chicago since 2002, bringing experience and passion to her work.