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Depression refers to severe and long-lasting 'down' times that impair regular activities. Depression can be caused by a variety of factors, including socioeconomic constraints, but a family history of depression and severe stress can increase the likelihood of the disease.  According to the World Health Organziation it is the most commonly reported mental health problem among women. 

According to Harvard University, changing estrogen levels during menstruation, after giving birth, and throughout menopause can provoke mood changes.  

Dorree Lynn, Ph.D., a psychologist and author of Getting Sane Without Going Crazy, says women "need a connection with others in their lives and without that sustenance, they tend to get depressed."

Qi (energy) enables the body to function in harmony.   Because women lose Qi during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and childbirth, it is more common for women to be Qi deficient than men.   Acupuncture treatments can correct these imbalances, support the immune system, and directly affect the way your body manages stress and your mental health.   

Words can also move Qi, which explains why talk therapy can give patients a sense of physical relief from symptoms.  A combination of acupuncture and Oriental medicine may be even more helpful.  

According to Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, researchers have noted greater therapeutic benefits from the use of combined therapies than from the use of independent therapies.

Contact a practitioner today to find out more about how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can be integrated into your emotional wellness plan!

Trina Lion, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac., is an American acupuncturist currently living in Shanghai, China, where for the past three years she has been teaching Traditional Chinese Medicine concepts including nutrition, herbs, and acupuncture.  She has apprenticed in two clinics in Shanghai, practiced for two years in an expat clinic, and taught at Jiao Tong University, one of the oldest universities in China. In December 2013 she completed her first textbook for students describing TCM terminology. Prior to becoming an acupuncturist, Trina was an educator and literacy specialist who created educational materials for institutions that included the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the American Museum of Natural History, and the New York Public Library, among others.

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